Three-Question Survey

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Photo by John Carl D'Annibale. From the August 8, 2013 Times Union.

January’s Survey Topic: Demographics

Please click here to go to the survey!
Each month The Nutrition and Education Committee (NEC) usually posts a survey in the Co-op Voice. Unfortunately, this month the committee cannot post a survey. They are always interested in your opinions, though. And they look forward to resuming the survey as soon as possible.

Instead, this month, I’ll be posting a quick survey on demographics, and I hope that all of you will do me the honor of responding. Knowing who shops at the Co-op is always helpful information for the Marketing Department. So, I will be forwarding the results of this survey to them. If you are the primary grocery shopper in your household, please tell us how old you are, how many people you shop for, and approximately how far you travel to shop at the Co-op.

November’s Survey Results

Thank you so much, for responding to the surveys! Please click here to see the full results of November’s survey. This survey focused on the Cheese and Specialty Food Department. Linda Donegan, the manager there, is very thankful, as well. She appreciated all your great feedback and will definitely heed the suggestions you made and make adjustments in the Cheese Department based on your survey input. She said it was very helpful to get her customers’ perspectives.

The first question from November’s survey was “When you shop for products in the Cheese and Specialty Food Department, what qualities are most important to you?” Local was clearly the most important quality, with more than two-thirds of the respondents’ votes. And did you know that more than 60% of the Co-op’s cheeses are local? That’s right! Taste, Organic, and Grass Fed had the vote of more than half of respondents. GMO-Free and Price were tied, with almost half, then came Free Range, Pasture Raised, Certified Naturally Grown, Raw, Allergen Free, Low Sodium, Animal Rennet Free/Kosher/Vegetarian, and Lactose-Free, in that order.

In the comments, one respondent asked for Vegan cheeses. We do have some vegan cheeses in the Grocery Department. They are in the end cap cooler in front of the egg aisle. Another respondent wanted to know more about the difference between free range and pasture raised. Well, there is currently no legal definition for “Free Range” or “Pasture Raised” in the United States. However, here are links to the Northeast Organic Farming Association of New York (NOFA-NY) and the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (USDA) for more information on the requirements of organic poultry production and a quick guide to eggs and common egg labels.

If you look at the Egg Chart, here, and posted on the right side of the egg cooler at the Co-op, you will notice that some of our suppliers give a brief description of the environments that their chickens are raised in. If you’d like further details you can always ask the friendly Staff behind the cheese counter.

The second question was “When you shop in the Cheese and Specialty Food Department, what Services are most important to you?” Clear Labeling and Knowledgeable & Friendly Staff tied, with two-thirds of respondents’ votes. Opportunities to Sample Cheeses and Wide Selection came in with almost one-half of respondents’ votes, then came Great Service, Low Prices, Easy to Find Selections Without Help From Staff, and Packaging, in that order.

Respondents who wrote in comments gave praise and thanks to the Cheese Department. Some looked for improved labeling and signage, more varied samples, vegan samples, and BPA free wrappings, and some had some suggestions for a bigger selection of fermented and/or cultured products. Just so you all know, the vegan cheeses and fermented and/or cultured products are managed by the Grocery Department and they will be hearing about your suggestions, as well.

The last question was “If you’ve used The Egg Chart when purchasing eggs, which choices were most important to you?” (The Egg Chart is posted on the right-hand side of the cooler, by the eggs.) More than one-half of respondents had never used the egg chart! Most said they didn’t know it was there. Pastured and/or Free Range and Antibiotic Free had about one-third of respondents’ votes. Raised With Humane Principles and Outside Access and/or Cage Free tied with one-quarter of the votes, then came GMO-Free, Certified Organic and Naturally Grown, NOFA-NY or USDA Certified, and Soy Free, in that order. Most respondents that commented on this question didn’t know there was an egg chart but, said they’d be looking for it in the future.

Thank you for participating in the survey!